1 After Kedushah (p. 52), one remains standing as at attention until after the sheliach tzibbur has said הא-ל הקדוש.2

Common practice notwithstanding, the sheliach tzibbur should recite מודים (p. 58) no more quietly than the rest of the repetition of Shemoneh Esreh.3

When reading the first verse of Birkas Kohanim (p. 60), the sheliach tzibbur inclines his head as follows: (a) he bows to the right when saying יברכך; (b) he faces right, but with head erect, when saying ה'; and (c) he bows forward when saying וישמרך.

When reading the second verse: (a) he bows to the left when saying יאר; (b) he faces left, but with head erect, when saying ה'; (c) he bows to the left when saying פניו; (d) likewise for אליך; and (e) he bows forward when saying ויחנך.

When reading the third verse: (a) he bows forward when saying ישא; (b) he faces ahead, but with head erect, when saying ה'; (c) he bows forward when saying פניו; (d) likewise for אליך; (e) he bows to the right when saying וישם; (f) he bows to the left when saying לך; and (g) he bows his head forward when saying שלום.4

After each of the above three verses the congregation answers אמן.5

During these blessings, it was the custom of the Rebbeim to face the sheliach tzibbur.6

After7 Shemoneh Esreh at Shacharis and Minchah one recites Vidui, the Confession (p. 61). For Tachanun8 and Nefilas Apayim one says Psalm 25 (p. 62), preceded by the verse that begins רחום וחנון, and followed9 by the verse that begins והוא יפדה. The paragraph beginning א-ל ארך אפים (p. 69) [which is usually read on Mondays and Thursdays] is omitted10 on Rosh Chodesh, Chanukah, Purim and Shushan Purim, on the two days of Purim Katan (in a leap year), on the day before Pesach and on the Ninth of Av [as well as on all other days when Tachanun is not said].