To explain [the above concepts]: the [Previous Rebbe’s] maamar focuses first on the verse,1 “All that is called by My name, indeed, it is for My glory that I have created it, formed it, and made it.” The phrase “I have created it, formed it, and made it,” berasiv, yetzartiv, af asitiv, refers to the three spiritual worlds Beriah, Yetzirah, and Asiyah, which include all the [spiritual] realms.2

[The maamar explains that the connection of the worlds to Or Ein Sof (“G‑d’s infinite light”) (in [their striving] to ascend) and the influence of Or Ein Sof within the worlds (as [diffused] from above) comes about through the Torah. This is the impli­cation of the phrase “for My glory that I have created it, formed it, and made it.” It is through “My glory” — and “the sole meaning of glory is Torah”3 — that the connection between the worlds and Or Ein Sof [is established] and [through this same medium,] Or Ein Sof is drawn down into the worlds.

The maamar continues, explaining that [more particularly,] the connection of the worlds to Or Ein Sof and the influence of Or Ein Sof within the worlds comes about through three modes of observance, Torah study, divine service, and deeds of kindness. The reason [why these three modes of observance are necessary] is4 because the three worlds Beriah, Yetzirah, and Asiyah [parallel our three means of expression,] thought, speech, and action.

Therefore, the connection of these three worlds to Or Ein Sof and the influence of Or Ein Sof within these three worlds comes about through Torah study, divine service [prayer], and deeds of kindness. For these three [modes of observance parallel] thought, speech, and action: {Divine service parallels thought,5 Torah study — speech,6 and deeds of kindness — deed}.

[Although] the verse states “it is for My glory that I have created it, formed it, and made it” — and “My glory” refers to the Torah — [this is not to the exclusion of the other two modes of observance. They are also channels through which man estab­lishes a bond with G‑d and through which G‑d diffuses influence to the worlds. The verse mentions the Torah alone explicitly,] because the other two [modes of observance], divine service and deeds of kindness must be governed by the Torah.

Similar concepts apply in regard to the creation of man, and the descent of his soul to [this material plane]. [In this process of] descent, [the soul] passes through the three worlds Beriah, Yetzirah, and Asiyah [as reflected in our morning blessings,7] “You created it (Beriah), You formed it (Yetzirah), and You blew it into my nostrils (Asiyah).” For the connection of man to Or Ein Sof and the influence of Or Ein Sof to man comes about through his endeavors in these three [modes of observance]: Torah, divine service, and deeds of kindness. And it is through these modes of service that the soul returns to its source in the essence of Or Ein Sof. [Not only do these endeavors elevate the soul to the level of] “it is pure” (i.e., the level of Atzilus, the level of the soul before its descent [which is alluded to by the phrase] of “And You created it”), the soul ascends to its original source in the essence of Or Ein Sof.

[This spiritual attainment is reflected in the verse,8] “And the spirit shall return to G‑d who granted it.” [The intent in this verse is not the departure of the soul from the body, death,] but rather even as the soul exists on this earthly plane, enclothed in a material body, it will be united with G‑d in complete oneness, just as it was included in the essence of Or Ein Sof (before the descent that began with G‑d’s breathing [the soul into man’s nostrils]).9